Tag Archives: CRC

Come Together Florida for Clean Air and Clean Water! VOTE #YesOn9!

Nothing has given me as much insight into the political process as serving on the 2017-2018 Constitution Revision Commission (http://flcrc.gov/index.html) When appointed by Florida’s President of the Senate, Joe Negron, my response was:” Are you kidding me? I don’t think I’m qualified for that.” He chuckled, and said in his confident, matter of fact way: “Jacqui, you’ll be fine.”

Although I did not have the experience of the other well-known lawyers and politicians, I was more versed in environmental issues, and made that my goal. After painstaking work, four of my citizen sponsored environmental proposals were rejected, (https://jacquithurlowlippisch.com/tag/environmental-proposals-for-crc/) but one made it to the finish line with close to a unanimous vote. This proposal was submitted by the Florida Wildlife Federation, and was a former Citizen’s Initiative ripe for rebirth: #91, Prohibiting Oil and Gas Drilling in Florida’s State Waters. In the end, the Style and Drafting Committee bundled #91 with #65: prohibiting vaping in public workspaces. I thought it was a perfect fit compared to be being bundled with any of the others; and the proposal would be bundled, I knew that.

Our theme was “clean air and clean water.”

As you may know, the amendment hasn’t been without controversy, and was taken with the rest of the bundled amendments all the way to Florida’s Supreme Court. Finally, they ruled on October 17, 2018, that the commission acted within its rules: “Unlike proposed amendments that originate through initiative petitions, amendments proposed by the CRC are not bound by the single-subject rule limiting amendments to one subject,” the ruling states.

Amendment-9-Ruling

Supreme Court: http://www.floridasupremecourt.org/decisions/opinions.shtml

To say I was relieved, is an understatement!

What a legacy for the state of Florida this could be! And November 6th, Election Day, is right around the corner.

Many times over the past year, during the stress of it all, I have visited the beach myself. Every single time I go, I am filled with inspiration. Walking along the shoreline watching young people, old people, people of every race, nationality, and socioeconomic  background;  studying seagulls fly, and pelicans dive with a skill beyond our human form; seeing silver schools of bait fish shining in the sunlight as the waves swell and dissipate;  watching smiling children bury each other in the sand, collect shells, and laugh as they run on little legs. Joyful!

The true happiness here belongs to all Floridians!

Do not let oil drilling ever take this away. This place, of all places, is where we can come together and appreciate God’s gifts of clean water and clean air. And when we have to pick up and go home, and Monday, be back at work, clean air should be guaranteed in our workplaces as well. We must protect what is sacred to us.

Come together Florida.

Vote yes on 9!

Amendment 9 provides voters with two-fold opportunity | Guest column by CRC Commissioners Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch and Lisa Carlton: https://www.tcpalm.com/story/opinion/contributors/2018/10/17/amendment-9-gives-voters-two-fold-opportunity-guest-column/1646155002/

Yes on 9 Florida: http://yeson9florida.org

Breathe Clean Florida:http://breathecleanfl.org

CRC Commissioners: http://flcrc.gov/Commissioners.html

Note that Amendment 9 is a grassroots amendment with not major funding as others below. Learn more about all Florida ballot amendments on Ballotpedia:

Ballotpedia: Florida Constitutional Amendments: http://ballotpedia.org/Florida_2018_ballot_measures

The Champion Fallen Oak, Nathaniel Pryor Reed, SLR/IRL

Champion oak tree in Angel Oak Park, on Johns Island, South Carolina, National Registry of Champion Oaks page, 2015, https://www.americanforests.org/explore-forests/americas-biggest-trees/champion-trees-national-register/ (Image: B.B. Easton)
Christine Stapleton, Palm Beach Post 2014 https://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/state–regional-govt–politics/tales-nature-and-power-award-enough-for-legendary-enviro-nat-reed/IGeJCG9mimBDuetearCDvN/
My parent’s fallen oak tree, 2016.

Nathaniel Pryor Reed 1933-2018

Obituary, Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/nathaniel-reed-leader-in-efforts-to-protect-endangered-wildlife-and-wetlands-dies-at-84/2018/07/13/ae25a46a-86a7-11e8-8f6c-46cb43e3f306_story.html?utm_term=.f87d9c61166c

Moon through the giant oak tree at my parents house, 11-6-14. (Photo Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch)

The death of elderly Mr Nathaniel Reed, was not completely unexpected. He was like an ancient champion oak, old and beautifully weathered. But the news of his death was shocking, bringing  tears and heartbreak to the many touched by his long branches, and the seeds he spread along the way.

I can never “not remember” Mr Reed. He was always, since my earliest childhood, a figment of my greater imagination and consciousness, an example of what it meant to have a meaningful life and purpose,  to walk and make change in the tainted world of politics, to choose the greater-good over greed, to inspire.

During my Sewall’s Point mayorship in 2011,  I first became active in the environmental community for which Martin County is known. Mr Reed planted the seeds, writing me a note here and there, on his quality stationary; in 2016, he gave the maximum amount to my campaign when I ran for county commissioner, District 1, and in his final years, Mr Reed wrote a Letter to the Editor of the Stuart News of which he sent me a copy.

At that time my student proposed Constitution Revision Commission proposal “A Right to a Clean Environment” was getting clobbered by Affiliated Industries, the Florida Chamber, The Florida Agriculture Coalition, and other powers who had assembled a legal team, including a former Florida Chief Justice to squash this threatening idea.

I was so worn down, and had been working so hard. Mr Reed’s letter and support reinvigorated me and the students. And although the proposal did not make the vote, it made smarter people than me on the CRC and throughout the state think, about how our paradise of Florida has become so polluted, and what we can do for change.

Let’s once again read Mr Reed’s words, at the trunk of the fallen champion oak remembering that we are his acorns, or even his resurrection fern…

Thank you Mr Reed. I am forever grateful. We will work towards your legacy.

Letter: Proposed amendment a brave effort to ensure a clean environment

Dec. 8, 2017

Thank you for the Dec. 1 editorial supporting the right to a clean environment!

The “usual suspects” are opposing the constitutional amendment proposed by Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch, which would receive strong support from the vast majority of Florida voters, just as they quietly opposed Amendment 1.

The fact that the Department of Environmental Protection and the Everglades Foundation have at last identified every polluter in the vast Okeechobee headwaters is an astonishing feat. The sheer number of polluters is mind-boggling.

The failure to enforce the possibly unenforceable standard (best management practices) shines through the research as testament to the carelessness of our state governmental agencies about enforcing strict water quality standards within the watershed.

There is not a lake, river nor estuary in Florida that is not adversely impacted by agricultural pollution.

As one of the authors of the 1973 Clean Water Act, I attempted late in the process to include agricultural pollution in the bill, but the major congressional supporters of the pending bill felt that by adding controls on agricultural pollution the bill would fail.

Now, 54 years later, fertilizer and dairy wastes are the main contributors to the pollution of the waters of our nation. Algal blooms are all too common even on the Great Lakes.

The “usual suspects” may defeat Thurlow-Lippisch’s brave effort, but you are right: The issues won’t go away!

Lefty Durando’s column clearly states the issues involved in the decades-long struggle to protect the Arctic National Wild Life Refuge. Having been there several times as assistant secretary, I have joined a group of well-known environmentalists, Republicans and Democrats urging defeat of the proposal to open the critical habitat of the coast zone to exploratory drilling. I suspect it is a lost cause, but one worth the fight to preserve the “Serengeti of the North”!

Nathaniel Reed, Hobe Sound

Links:

The Right to a Clean Environment Should Be Written Into Florida’s Constitution, JTL, Stuart News: https://www.tcpalm.com/story/opinion/contributors/2017/10/26/right-clean-environment-should-written-into-florida-constitution-guest-column/802410001/

News, Bruce Ritchie, Politico: Affiliated Industries Prepares to Fight a Right to a Clean Environment: https://www.politico.com/states/florida/story/2017/11/22/industry-to-fight-proposed-constitutional-amendment-for-clean-healthful-environment-122148

Resurrection fern

What!? What was Approved by the CRC for the 2018 Ballot?

Full CRC, 3-21-18

P 6001: Rights of Crime Victims; Judges
P 6002: First Responder and Military Member Survivor Benefits; Public Colleges and Universities
P 6003: School Board Term Limits and Duties; Public Schools
P 6004: Prohibits Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling; Prohibits Vaping in Enclosed Indoor Workplaces
P 6005: State and Local Government Structure and Operation
P 6006: Property Rights; Removal of Obsolete Provision; Criminal Statutes
P 6007: Lobbying and Abuse of Office by Public Officers
P 6012: Ends Dog Racing

You may have read a plethora of articles on the completed work of the 2018 Constitution Revision Commission and thought to yourself, “What!?”

Today I am going share the CRC press release that includes all of the proposals, now revisions, that will become constitutional amendments for the public to vote for or against on the 2018 ballot. Here they are in one place where you can easily research them.

Six of the proposed amendments are grouped, and “related.” Although for many, controversial, in my opinion, this can be a good thing, is perfectly legal, and we all know this was done in similar but not exact fashion by both the ’78 and ’98 CRCs. Unlike Citizen Initiatives, the CRC is not held to a “single subject.” There is a reason for this; it allows more ideas to be included. To be inclusive was the goal as there were over 2000 public or commissioner proposals submitted, and only 20 were approved to go on the ballot. To accommodate, six groups that were determined to be legally related and achieved at least 22 votes by the commission are “bundled.” Two though are separate. ~for a total of 8. In the future we will study each amendment, grouped or alone,  independently; today those that were voted to go forward to the ballot 2018 are presented.

I am proud of the work of the commission! It has been my greatest honor to be a part. We devoted over one year of service, and heard thousands of diverse Floridian’s speak out. We have provided many varied choices for voters to move into the future of the next twenty years…until the 2038 Constitution Revision Commission convenes! “Getting there” should be interesting, and we all must get involved to make Florida’s challenging and changing future the best possible. We must read, study, talk to other fellow Floridians, debate, and VOTE!

I have read many articles myself and wish to share one that is great at simplifying the 8 amendments as it provides a chart. This article is written by Aron C. Dunlap of Carlton Fields in West Palm Beach. I do not know him or the law firm, but I thank Mr Dunlap for publishing:

Please go here for chart: (https://www.carltonfields.com/florida-constitution-revision-commission-meets-for-final-time-and-approves-8-ballot-measures/)

Hmmm? 20 more years until the next CRC….I will be 74 years old by then! How about you? 🙂

CRC Office — Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, April 16, 2018, CONTACT: Meredith Beatrice, (850) 508-5204

CRC APPROVES EIGHT REVISIONS FOR THE 2018 GENERAL ELECTION BALLOT

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Pursuant to Article XI, Section 2 of the Florida Constitution, the Constitution Revision Commission (CRC) today voted to approve eight revisions to be placed on the 2018 General Election ballot for voter consideration.

CRC Chairman Carlos Beruff, said, “For more than a year, Commissioners have traveled across the state to speak directly with citizens about the changes they want to see in the Florida Constitution. After months of in-depth research and debate, the CRC has narrowed down thousands of comments and ideas into eight final revisions for voter consideration. From protecting our state and territorial waters from oil drilling to strengthening our ethics laws, I commend my fellow Commissioners for their hard work and leadership representing the people of Florida. We are grateful to the thousands of Floridians who participated in this historic process and look forward to letting voters have the final say in November.”

Proposed constitutional revisions on the ballot must secure at least 60 percent voter approval to become law. A formal report will be submitted to the Florida Secretary of State as soon as possible. A list of the final revisions approved by the CRC are provided below; the full text of each revision is available on flcrc.gov:

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ABOUT THE FLORIDA CONSTITUTION REVISION COMMISSION (CRC)

Once every 20 years, Florida’s Constitution provides for the creation of a 37-member revision commission for the purpose of reviewing Florida’s Constitution and proposing changes for voter consideration. The Constitution Revision Commission (CRC) meets for approximately one year, traveling the State of Florida, identifying issues, performing research and possibly recommending changes to the Constitution. Any amendments proposed by the CRC would be placed on the 2018 General Election ballot. For additional information, visit flcrc.gov. Follow the CRC on social media @FloridaCRC (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube).

CRC website, press release: http://www.flcrc.gov/Media/PressReleases/Show/1099

CRC official photo March 2017

Pensacola Dreamin’, P91 No Oil or Gas Drilling in Florida’s Territorial Seas, CRC

Landing in Pensacola For years, I have had a reoccurring dream.

I am looking up at an absolutely blue and cloudless sky; white, sparkling sands are hot beneath my feet; and crashing waves of emerald green, mesmerize…

Blue. White. Green. This is all there is. This is the vision, the dream. And it is real. These are my memories of living at Pensacola Beach.

Pensacola Beach

More than twenty years later, I am not dreaming. I am back, and I am fighting for CRC proposal 91, “no oil or gas drilling in Florida’s territorial seas,” our state waters.

Full text, etc. P91 CRC website: (http://flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner/2017?billNumber=91&searchOnlyCurrentVersion=True&isIncludeAmendments=False&pageNumber=0)

2-26-18, Pensacola News Journal, Kevin Robinson, “Public Support Could End Drilling:” https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.pnj.com/amp/367909002

In the early 1990s, I came to Pensacola from UF in Gainesville, to teach German and English at Pensacola High School in both the traditional and International Baccalaureate Program.

I learned perhaps as much as my students. It was hard and rewarding work. I matured here one could say.

My mom, me and Dash mid 1990s

Maturing didn’t just involve the discipline of being a teacher, but also the responsibility of my first dog. “Dash,” as he was named for his ability to sprint. Dash was a stray I found in Downtown’s Seville Square. He was as beautiful and white as Pensacola Beach with black spots over his eyes. Even my parents visited to meet him!

Every evening he sat by my side for hours as I graded papers long into night. I would leave at 6 am for the first bell at 7:01. When I got home from a day of teaching, Dash and I would swim at Pensacola Beach or take long walks to Fort Pickens and then of course, grade papers,

These were wonderful times! The powerful simplicity of the blue sky, the green waves,  the white sands, and my white and black best friend, forever left an impression on me.

Though I have been back home in Stuart, and Sewall’s Point, in Martin County for over twenty years, my life has changed, and Dash has passed away–Pensacola still holds my heart. Nothing compares to its white sandy beaches and how could I forget? Its longest of Florida histories! http://news.wfsu.org/post/pensacola-discovery-complicates-title-oldest-city; https://www.visitpensacola.com/things-to-do/history-heritage/

Hopefully we will continue to make history in Pensacola today.

Pensacola will be the linchpin in convincing the CRC to support P91 to go on the 2018 ballot: “No Oil and Gas Drilling in Florida’s Territorial Seas:” please attend today’s public hearing at UWF from 1-7 pm to speak. Read here for details. 😎 http://www.northescambia.com/2018/02/constitution-revision-commission-to-hold-pensacola-public-hearing-tuesday 🇺🇸🐬

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is a commissioner for the 2018 CRC, the former mayor of Sewall’s Point, and an environmental activist

http://flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

What Are the 37 CRC Proposals that Could be on the 2018 Florida Ballot?

Constitution Revision Commission 2018 official website: http://flcrc.gov and official list of the 37 proposals: http://flcrc.gov/PublishedContent/ADMINISTRATIVEPUBLICATIONS/CRCActiveProposalsHearings2018.pdf

 

Below is a list and very scant summary of each of the 37 proposal that made it through the Constitution Revision Commission committee process, and thus it is now possible for any one of these to get on the 2018 Florida ballot.

Presently, continuing almost one year of work, the CRC is holding public hearings and you are invited to attend!  http://flcrc.gov/Meetings/PublicHearing with focus on these 37 issues.

After the hearings the full CRC will decide on the 37…

As there is no easy way on the web site to find the 37 proposals, one can use the following list just to get an idea of the proposal topic. 1.) For complete information go to http://flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner, 2.) then click the link under “Number” on far left side. 3.) Once a new screen comes up, click on “web-page” or “PDF” to read the language of the proposal. It is important to read the entire proposal to understand it in full.

Also, there is the possibility that a proposal that was voted on– and did not pass committee–could be resurrected. These are not on this list.

Thank you for your involvement in the great state of Florida! I hope this list is useful.

Jacqui

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is a commissioner for the 2018 CRC
http://flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

Subject of proposal:

P3 Deleting language on prohibiting land ownership by “aliens” ineligible for citizenship

P4 Deleting language barring funds from public treasury to aid church, sect, or religious denomination…

P6 …judges may not defer to administrative agency’s interpretations of statute, must interpret de novo

P9 Veteran’s Affairs/Executive Branch language

P10 Civics education in public schools

P11 Closing the Write in Candidate loophole that closes Open Primaries as specified already  in Florida constitution

P12 Deleting amendment for high-speed train as it was already repealed by amendment

P13 Requiring every county (charter/non charter) to elect constitutional officers: sheriff, tax collector, property appraiser and supervisor of elections

P20 Repeal of criminal statute shall not affect prosecution for any crime committed before such repeal

P26  Office of Domestic Security and Counter-Terrorism is created within the Florida Dept. of Law Enforcement

P29 E-Verify-deals (with immigration/business)

P33 All counties must appoint superintendents rather than vote for them

P34 “Clean-up” provision of Dec. of Rights (language)

P37 Only allows for buildings to be named for individuals after they have left office

P39 Must wait six years after leaving position of elected office in to lobby legislature

P41 Retirement age for judges would go from 70 to 75

P43 Would create an 8 year term limit for school board members

P44 University tuition increases would require “more votes” making it more difficult to increase tuition

P45 “nothing” may limit “other” education services —in addition to free public schools

P47 Certain judgeships would require 10 years of Florida Bar membership

P49 Benefits for surviving family members of first responders killed in duty

P50 A candidates for state legislature must live in district he or she is running for…

P54 Certificate of Need – can no longer limit number to given to an area…(i.e. hospitals/Hospice)

P55 Legislature pays off fees for clerks’ offices —where those fees are not taken by county residents

P65 Vaping added to constitution on “smoking in workplace”

P66 Lt. Gov would have official “duties”

P67 Banning betting on greyhound dog racing…

P71 Nothing may limit the legislature from creating alternative processes to authorize the establishment of charter schools…

P72 2/3 vote required of legislature to raise taxes or fees

P83 Specifies the purposes of the state college system and provides for a governance structure

P88 Bill of rights for nursing home residents

P91 Would ban oil and gas drilling in Florida’s state waters

P93 Would authorize school boards in high performing school districts to become “charter districts”

P94 Would allow funds from Statewide Tobacco Education and Prevention Program to go to cancer research

P96 Marcy’s Law- victims’ rights

P97 Not voting on constitutional amendment would be counted as a “no”- makes threshold to pass constitutional amendments more difficult for public

P103 Specifies dates for legislature to convene for regular session –second Tuesday after the first Monday in January of each even-numbered year

 


	

Let’s Make History! “No Oil and Gas Drilling in Florida’s Territorial Seas”~ Florida ballot 2018

This past Wednesday, I presented, P91 or “No Oil and Gas Drilling in Florida’s Territorial Seas” to the Declaration of Rights Committee of the Constitution Revision Commission. This was the second and final committee hearing and it passed! My other four environmental proposals were “killed”…

To be clear, as it is confusing, there are coastal territorial seas and there are offshore federal waters. This proposal would protect our territorial seas, our state waters, the waters under our jurisdiction. These waters have been drilled before and, hands down, if the oil and gas industry can, they will influence our state legislature so that they can drill our coastal waters again. There is no doubt about it. Just study history!

We all know, drilling so close to shore, as is done in other coastal southern states, would be visually, environmentally, and economically destructive to Florida’s unique/peninsular marine, real estate, and tourism resouces.

It is written in Article II of our state constitutional that “we shall protect our natural resources and scenic beauty.” P91 belongs in Florida’s Constitution. It would be an enormous statement on behalf of the people of Florida and would have major policy implications on many levels helping to keep all oil drilling away from our state today and in the future.

P91 is now one of 37 proposals of 103 that made it through the CRC committee process.

Today I am publishing the notes from my presentation that should be interesting and informative to readers.

Thank you for following the CRC process and I will keep you appraised of P91 as the CRC process continues and we move towards what gets on the ballot for 2018.

In the end, we must do something for our environment!

Fondly,

Jacqui

P91, presentation Declaration of Rights 1-31-18

Greetings Chair Carlton and Honorable Commissioners; I am Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch  from the Town of Sewall’s Point in Martin County.

This morning, I am pleased to be presenting P91, also known as, “no oil and gas drilling in Florida’s territorial seas.”

~So you may ask,“ what are Florida’s territorial seas?”

The boundaries of Florida’s territorial seas are based on the foresight of our forefathers who expanded the boundaries of Florida, accepted into Florida’s Constitution in 1868 during the era we rejoined the Union. These boundaries are defined as: three marine leagues, or approximately 9 miles, on to the west coast, in the Gulf of Mexico, and extending as far as the shifting Gulf Stream, or three miles east, which ever is further, into the Atlantic Ocean off Florida’s east coast.

The US Code defines Florida’s territorial seas as three marine leagues on the west cost, and three miles out on the east coast.

Most of us have forgotten our history, but in 1944 Florida sold “everything hugging the shore out to 10.36 miles, from Apalachicola to Naples,” on the Gulf Coast to Arnold Oil Company. These lands consisted of of 3.6 million acres.

After decades of embittered fighting, unsuccessful exploration, and a movement to end the leases, in 1989 the Florida legislature banned oil and gas drilling in Florida’s territorial waters and stopped collecting lease money from the oil company that had the rights to these leases lands.

The battle ensued over time and party lines, but in 2002 Governor Jeb Busch with the help of his brother, the president of the United States, arranged for the oil company to accept 12.5 million state dollars to “abandon all further claims.” This transaction was finalized by 2005 with great fanfare of the public that was ecstatic to have Florida’s beautiful beaches and important natural resources “off the table.”

And yet by 2006 there were rumblings and by 2009, there was even serious talk of a bill on the floor of the Florida Legislature allowing for drilling within five miles of Florida’s west coast. Once again, tremendous pressure to reopen Florida’s territorial seas!

In 2010 the nightmare of the BP Deepwater Horizon really took this possibility off the table for discussion, but we must not be naive, especially in the current climate, this threat to our shores is still there!

Today, you as Commissions  of the Constitution Revision Commission have a chance to make history by voting “yes” on P91 “no oil and gas drilling in Florida’s territorial seas,” giving the possibility for Floridians to put language into our state constitution in 2018 that would protect Florida.

Let’s make history.

1868 map
Florida’s territorial seas
Gulf Stream

Links:

P91 CRC http://flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner/2017/0091

Herald Tribune 2009 http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20090926/News/605227437

Florida Trend 2009 http://www.floridatrend.com/article/5050/revenue-vs-environment

Earth Justice, David Guest,  2009:https://earthjustice.org/blog/2009-september/oil-drilling-axis-targets-floridas-offshore

Offshore Magazine, Destin Dome: http://www.offshore-mag.com/articles/print/volume-57/issue-3/news/exploration/eastern-us-gulf-of-mexico-destin-dome-may-yet-revive-eastern-gulf-of-mexico.html

Blake Plateau, Florida’s east coast is under partial currents of the Gulf Stream: http://edcon-prj.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/G1094_ocean.jpg

USGS Blake Plateau https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0659/report.pdf

CRC Analysis 2 http://flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner/2017/0091/Analyses/2017p0091.pre.dr.PDF

______________________________

The next phase of the CRC is public hearings; there is a hearing in Ft Lauderdale tomorrow. After the public hearings the final proposals will be chosen to go on the 2018 ballot.
http://flcrc.gov/Media/PressReleases/Show/1071

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is a member of the 2018 CRC, all comments are public record:  http://flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

Florida Channel’s taping of prevention: Thank you to those who spoke in favor of the proposal. https://thefloridachannel.org/videos/1-31-18-constitution-revision-commission-declaration-rights-committee/

Article 11 Sec. 1 of our constitution defines Florida’s boundaries. Our forefathers had foresight in doing this. Our boundaries are much more extensive than other coastal sates. May we have the same foresight in expanding the boundaries to protect or territorial seas.

A Picture Speaks a 1000 Words About Florida’s Governors, CRC

The Florida Capitol is a walk through our state’s history. It’s really worth a visit just to look around. Over most of the walls, hang portraits and pictures that tell the story of our state.

Today, I thought I would feature what I call the “Hall of Governors” that one passes on the way to the Constitution Revisions Commission’s (CRC) headquarters. My photos are taken right to left as I exited the CRC, adjacent to the Governor’s office.

From what I understand, each governor has input into the mood and composition of his, (as there are yet no “her”), portrait. I find this very interesting. Look closely and see what this reveals.

And what shall be our future?

Le Roy Collins 1955-1961
Charlie Crist 2007-2011
Claude Kirk 1967-1971
Jeb Bush 1999-2007
Ruben Askew 1971-1979
Buddy MaKay 1998-1999
Bob Graham 1979-1987
Lawton Chiles 1991-1998
Wayne Mixon January 3, 1987-January 6, 1987
Bob Martinez 1987-1991

Governor portraits, Florida Dept. of State:
http://dos.myflorida.com/florida-facts/florida-history/florida-governors/

List of Florida governors: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Governors_of_Florida

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is a member of the 2018 CRC: https://www.flcrc.gov