CRC P24 Comr. of Environmental Protection Presentation, “Save the Florida Goose”

The following are my notes, images, and basic outline for my presentation to the CRC Executive Committee for P24, Creating a Commissioner of Environmental Protection. I will present on January 11th at 11am. JTL

CRC Executive Committee Agenda: https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees/EX/ExpandedAgenda/141

To write to members of Exec. Committee in support or with concerns: https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees/EX/
____________________________________________________

Notes: P24, Creating a Commissioner of Environmental Protection or “CEP.” SAVE THE FLORIDA GOOSE

Inspiration

~”Florida has this magical thing— that one person can make a difference…” CRC Chair Carlos Beruff, 4-12-17, interview, Florida Channel

~2 members of the public verbally presented the idea of Commissioner of Environmental Protection thus a Cabinet position for the environment during the  CRC Public Hearings that took place across the state in 2017.

~Public Proposal 700012 was submitted in written form by Mr Gamez below:

PUB 700012: To Make a Broader Approach to Protecting the Environment by Carlos Gamez

ARTICLE IV: EXECUTIVE, New Section. Catchline: Department of Environmental Protection The Legislature may create a department of Environmental Protection and prescribe its duties. The provisions governing the administration of the department must comply with Section 6 of Article VI of the State Constitution.

This led to P24, sponsored by JTL .The people were the inspiration for this proposal.

 CRC - 2017                                                  P 24
       
       
        
       By Commissioner Thurlow-Lippisch
       
       thurlowlj-00025A-17                                     201724__
    1                         A proposal to amend                       
    2         Sections 3 and 4 of Article IV and create a new
    3         section in Article XII of the State Constitution to
    4         establish the office of Commissioner of Environmental
    5         Protection as a statewide elected officer, to provide
    6         duties of the commissioner, and to include the
    7         commissioner as a member of the Cabinet.
    8          
    9  Be It Proposed by the Constitution Revision Commission of
   10  Florida:
   11  
   12         Sections 3 and 4 of Article IV of the State Constitution
   13  are amended to read:
   14                             ARTICLE IV                            
   15                              EXECUTIVE                            
   16         SECTION 3. Succession to office of governor; acting
   17  governor.—
   18         (a) Upon vacancy in the office of governor, the lieutenant
   19  governor shall become governor. Further succession to the office
   20  of governor shall be prescribed by law. A successor shall serve
   21  for the remainder of the term.
   22         (b) Upon impeachment of the governor and until completion
   23  of trial thereof, or during the governor’s physical or mental
   24  incapacity, the lieutenant governor shall act as governor.
   25  Further succession as acting governor shall be prescribed by
   26  law. Incapacity to serve as governor may be determined by the
   27  supreme court upon due notice after docketing of a written
   28  suggestion thereof by four three cabinet members, and in such
   29  case restoration of capacity shall be similarly determined after
   30  docketing of written suggestion thereof by the governor, the
   31  legislature or four three cabinet members. Incapacity to serve
   32  as governor may also be established by certificate filed with
   33  the custodian of state records by the governor declaring
   34  incapacity for physical reasons to serve as governor, and in
   35  such case restoration of capacity shall be similarly
   36  established.
   37         SECTION 4. Cabinet.—
   38         (a) There shall be a cabinet composed of an attorney
   39  general, a chief financial officer, a commissioner of
   40  environmental protection, and a commissioner of agriculture. In
   41  addition to the powers and duties specified herein, they shall
   42  exercise such powers and perform such duties as may be
   43  prescribed by law. In the event of a tie vote of the governor
   44  and cabinet, the side on which the governor voted shall be
   45  deemed to prevail.
   46         (b) The attorney general shall be the chief state legal
   47  officer. There is created in the office of the attorney general
   48  the position of statewide prosecutor. The statewide prosecutor
   49  shall have concurrent jurisdiction with the state attorneys to
   50  prosecute violations of criminal laws occurring or having
   51  occurred, in two or more judicial circuits as part of a related
   52  transaction, or when any such offense is affecting or has
   53  affected two or more judicial circuits as provided by general
   54  law. The statewide prosecutor shall be appointed by the attorney
   55  general from not less than three persons nominated by the
   56  judicial nominating commission for the supreme court, or as
   57  otherwise provided by general law.
   58         (c) The chief financial officer shall serve as the chief
   59  fiscal officer of the state, and shall settle and approve
   60  accounts against the state, and shall keep all state funds and
   61  securities.
   62         (d) The commissioner of environmental protection shall have
   63  supervision of matters pertaining to environmental protection
   64  that the Department of Environmental Protection or its successor
   65  agency and water management districts are required or authorized
   66  by law to implement and administer.
   67         (e) The commissioner of agriculture shall have supervision
   68  of matters pertaining to agriculture except as otherwise
   69  provided by law.
   70         (f)(e) The governor as chair, the chief financial officer,
   71  and the attorney general shall constitute the state board of
   72  administration, which shall succeed to all the power, control,
   73  and authority of the state board of administration established
   74  pursuant to Article IX, Section 16 of the Constitution of 1885,
   75  and which shall continue as a body at least for the life of
   76  Article XII, Section 9(c).
   77         (g)(f) The governor as chair, the chief financial officer,
   78  the attorney general, the commissioner of environmental
   79  protection, and the commissioner of agriculture shall constitute
   80  the trustees of the internal improvement trust fund and the land
   81  acquisition trust fund as provided by law.
   82         (h)(g) The governor as chair, the chief financial officer,
   83  the attorney general, the commissioner of environmental
   84  protection, and the commissioner of agriculture shall constitute
   85  the agency head of the Department of Law Enforcement.
   86  
   87         A new section is added to Article XII of the State
   88  Constitution to read:
   89                             ARTICLE XII                           
   90                              SCHEDULE                             
   91         Recomposition of the cabinet; commissioner of environmental
   92  protection.—The amendment to Section 4 of Article IV relating to
   93  the election of the commissioner of environmental protection and
   94  the inclusion of the commissioner as a member of the cabinet
   95  shall take effect January 3, 2023, but shall govern with respect
   96  to the qualifying for and the holding of the primary and general
   97  elections for the office of commissioner of environmental
   98  protection in 2022.

THE TIME IS NOW for the Environment to get a Seat at the Table.

Florida Chamber’s population growth projections: 6,000,000 more people for a population of 26,000,000 people by 2030…

1000 Friends of Florida “A Population Distribution Scenario for the State of Florida” 2060. This shows the areas projected to become the most populated highly impacting natural lands and water resources.

FEGN- Florida Ecological Green Network Priorities,  2016. This map shows the  importance of creating a priorities  for Wildlife Corridor creation in the growing state of Florida. Done correctly we can have both growth and connected lands for wildlife and water. But we must plan now for the next 20 years and beyond. We will never have this chance again.

Florida Department of Environmental Protection map below shows Impaired Waters of the State: 53% Rivers; 82% Lakes; 32% Estuaries. This doesn’t even mention our very impacted and magnitude lessened springs.

Water management districts have individual governing boards but the Department of Environmental Protection may exercise general supervisory authority over water management districts (s. 373.026(7), Florida Statutes). I think “may” in this sentence needs to be reinterpreted. It is too weak for today’s pressures.

Creating a Comr. of Environmental Protection would elevate today’s “Department of Environmental Protection” giving it more autonomy and less impact from the often destructive and brutal pendulum swings of politics.

Agriculture already has a Cabinet seat and has a Dept of Water Quality that oversees Best Management Practices. Why shouldn’t the environment be on equal footing with Agriculture? The environment and Florida’s tourism industry are the number one income generator of the state, agriculture claims the number two spot.

We must note that since the last CRC in 1998, our waters have become even more impaired and our lands purchases are not always well represented to the Legislature or mindful of the importance of “connectedness.” Having a Commissioner of Environmental Protection would give us leadership for a higher standard, better communication, and better success for all the public to see.

Would the people of Florida support a Commissioner of Environmental Protection? Absolutely. The people of Florida have spoke loudly in 2014. Amendment 1, 2014 now in the Florida Constitution as Art X, Sec. 28 continues to be controversial as the legislature resented what they saw as forced direction of appropriations/money. Nonetheless, it was the will of the people. A Commissioner of Environmental Protection could help ameliorate this situation with the State Legislature and and the public.

*October 2016 Poll: “Top Concerns of Floridians are economy and environment.”~ Miami Herald. (Water related problems top concern 34%; 20% Loss of Natural Lands for Wildlife second.) “The focus on the environment as top concern behind the economy should not surprise anyone who has lived in Florida…Florida’s economy has long been closely linked to its environmental assets.”

As Chair Beruff stated: “Florida has this magical thing...”

We must think about this….

If we lose the magic, if will don’t protect our environment and the people’s love of it, we lose “Florida,” killing our Goose that lays our Golden Egg…

“A cottager and his wife had a Hen that laid a golden egg every day. They supposed that the Hen must contain a great lump of gold in its inside, and in order to get the gold they killed her. Having done so, they found to their surprise that the Hen differed in no respect from their other hens. The foolish pair, thus hoping to become rich all at once, deprived themselves of the gain of which they were assured day by day…” Aesop’s Fables

In closing:

The need for Leadership; Give the Environment a Seat at the Table with a Florida Cabinet member; CRC can put P24 on the 2018 ballot and allow the electorate to vote for a Commissioner of Environmental Protection in 2022. Save the Florida Goose.

Organizational Chart for Florida 2017
P24 proposed change

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is a member of the 2018 Constitution Revision Commission: https://www.flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

What’s Up With Me and the CRC? January 2018

Image via WTSP: http://www.wtsp.com/news/politics/florida/whos-behind-fls-constitution-revision-commission/477559159

2018 has arrived.

I was appointed to the Constitution Revision Commission, that meets only once every 20 years, last February, by Senate President Joe Negron (https://www.flcrc.gov). After a dizzying time, I’d say, I feel like I am finally catching my stride. The entire experience has been a lot like when I moved to Berlin, Germany in 1989. It was cold and I did not speak the language, but after many months of study and applying myself, it started to feel natural.

I have learned the CRC history; mastered the insane elevator system at the Capitol; gotten insight into the complexities of power and politics; met people from all over the state with their own serious issues; recognized the incredible importance of staff and of journalists;  have learned how to run an effective legislative-style meeting; and how to stand my ground on a vote.

I have tried to apply the “5-Cs” that an army general taught me years ago…. Communication, Collaboration, Compromise,  Cooperation, and Consensus…

As you may know, I sponsored 5 CRC environmental proposals. These came from the public’s submittals on-line, or from a public hearing earlier last year. One was a former citizen’s initiative. Today I will review where I am and where I think things are going.

The proposal that has gotten the most attention as well as the most push back–with 4 AIF hired Gunster lawyers, one a former Supreme Court Justice, fighting tooth and nail—has been P23, “A Right to Clean and Healthful Environment.” It was workshopped and heard by the Judicial Committee and I expect it to be voted on Friday, January 12, 2018. Due to the controversy, the  prognosis does not look good,  but it has raised environmental awareness for all of the proposals, and in my opinion made the business and government community look desperate to hold on to Florida’s “standard environmental operating procedure” that puts corporations and development before people. This power will not last forever, and we are all dependent on Florida’s good nature for our “riches.” —A search will pull up a multitude of editorials, news articles, and opinions, on this subject.

Two others will also be heard this coming week. P24 “Commissioner Environmental Protection”and P48 “FWC/Wildlife Corridors.” Both of these will be discussed and voted on  by the Executive Committee of which I happen to sit on. P48 would allow FWC to protect habitat not just species. This seems a no brainer as how can you have species without protecting their habitat; but private property and development rights play into the equation so it will be a fight. I look forward to the discussion and for all of us to realize that one way or another, the only way to approach Florida’s growth filled future is with the pragmatic goal of statewide living wildlife corridors, connected and protected lands.

P24 would establish a Commissioner of Environmental Protection. A  cabinet position. Just like Agriculture. Since the environment is linked to our number one state income generator–tourism  it seems the time has come….challenging power structures is always a wrestling match, but this is one we can win.

The following week, on January 18, I expect to go before the Legislative Committee for P46, “Clarifying Language in Amendment 1 2014, or Land Acquisition Trust Fund.” It was heard once already but “temporarily postponed” to requests by committee and myself to work on the language. Sue Mullins and Clay Henderson are backbone of this proposal, know the background, etc., and I am fortunate to have their expertise.

And finally…

I expect on January 19 to go before the Declaration of Rights Committee for P91,”No gas and oil drilling in Florida’s territorial waters.”

P91 is the  only one of the five proposals to have “passed committee” in December. What is so amazing to me about this proposal is its timeliness. When I took it on, I actually first thought to myself, “You know, isn’t this kind of pase’? The River Kidz were protesting oil drilling with Surfrider Foundation in 2012. This won’t happen here…” But because it was past citizens’ initiative, and the language had already been reviewed, and because Manley Fuller who is a legend in the environmental community and the president of the Florida Wildlife Federation brought it to my attention, recommending I support it, I submitted the proposal three minutes before the deadline.

Now many months have passed and things have quickly changed. As headlines explode with oil drilling and federal opening of submerged lands including Floirda’s…it seems serendipitous that this proposal is lined up for the CRC, every Florida politician — regardless of party affiliation, and the diverse citizens of the state of Florida to support.

Some people would call it a “God-wink;” I like to think so. I will fight for every proposal, but it sure is nice to feel the wind at my back.

Rainbow over the Atlantic Ocean. (Jensen Beach, 2-8-15, Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch)

See CRC Calendars here: https://www.flcrc.gov/Meetings/Calendars/2017

To write committees mentioned above in support or with concerns see Committee Tab here and then link to committee: https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is Chair of General Provisions, her proposals can be viewed here, and she can be emailed from this link: https://www.flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

Reflections–Florida’s Constitutional Convention of 1885

As I prepare myself for the continuation and 2018 closure of the Constitution Revision Commission, I am reviewing my history. Thanks to my parent’s historic Florida book collection, I did not have to go any further than their living room bookshelves…

The 1968 Constitution is credited with “making modern Florida,” as written about by Mary E. Atkins. It was the 1885 constitution that was “remade.”

According to historical records, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_Constitution_of_1885 ) the 1885 constitution ratified at the convention passed with a vote of 31,804 to 21,243. It was “the model” of Florida’s government until 1968 and “represented the regression to racial discrimination which was occurring throughout the South in the post-Reconstruction period.”

The Constitution was weighted in favor of counties. Each new county was entitled to one to three representatives according to population…This overrepresentation of rural areas led to increasing tension in twentieth-century Florida politics, as central and then south Florida grew. It was a major factor leading to the current Constitution of 1968, which changed apportionment.”

It remains interesting to note the eloquence and tone of the times…

There is always something “good” and something “bad” to learn from history. It will be most interesting to see the history the 2018 Constitution Revision Commission leaves behind (https://www.flcrc.gov).

Temporary Chairman, Judge A.E. Maxwell, of Escambia, First Day, Tuesday, June 9, 1885:

...”The unusual and exceeding importance of the work before us can be estimated by the fact that we are the delegates of the people, acting in their sovereign capacity, emphatically delegates, but empowered to construct for them a system of State Government —a Constitution–that fundamental frame work which defines rights of persons and property and at the same time provides an organization by which their rights are to be secured, protected and defended. I trust we are all fully impressed with the heavy responsibilities of such a position, and that we will not permit ourselves to be led away from the discharge of its duties by any petty personal ambition or by any selfish schemes. The people who have put their trust in us feel that they have a guarantee of our good faith in their behalf and our devotion to their interest, in the fellowship which ties us to them as being ourselves a part of the people; and therefore, entirely identified with them in the desire and purpose to establish such government as will relive them from the evils of the present system, and ensure to them and their prosperity the blessings of civil and religious liberty.” 

 

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch is a member of the 2018 CRC: https://www.flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

Calendar for upcoming CRC meetings (subject to change) https://www.flcrc.gov/Meetings/Calendars/2017

Coastal Connections, SLR/IRL

Child’s drawing of tailless Winter and new friend baby Hope. Both of these dolphins were rescued from the IRL and now reside at CMA, in Clearwater, Fl.

The first thing I noticed flying in to St Petersburg was that they had a lot  of seagrass beds…

“How in can a place with so many people have so much more seagrass than Stuart?” I thought to myself. “Well, number one, they don’t have releases from Lake Okeechobee destroying their estuary every few years, and they are known for the state’s most successful estuary restoration program–of Tampa Bay (http://www.tbep.org) something we are trying to emulate for the Indian River Lagoon (http://www.irlcouncil.com).

It was the new year’s weekend and Ed and I had decided to “get away.”

What I had forgotten is that Clearwater, our destination, is home to Winter and Hope, Indian River east coast dolphins who were rescued by Harbor Branch (http://www.fau.edu/hboi/marine_mammals/) based in St Lucie County who were then rehabilitated at Clearwater Marine Aquarium on the west coast.  These dolphins could not be released. Winter, an amputee due to a crab trap cutting off her tail, and Hope, an orphan who was suckling on her dead mother when found never learned life skills…

Today these dolphins are alive, friends, inspiring thousands of people including a multitude of veteran and children amputees, have starred in two feature films, and have made Clearwater a favorite nationwide family destination: (https://www.seewinter.com)

The experience of visiting the aquarium, made me think about how connected we all really are. How much we can do together. If Harbor Branch had not saved these IRL dolphins, Winter and Hope would not be the worldwide ambassadors for their species that they are today.

Yes, we are all connected across our great state! Happy 2018 Florida!

 

Seagrass beds as we approach St Petersburg

At the CWA having fun
Clearwater Causway
Ed in his Bullsugar shirt along the causeway

Documenting the Discharges 12-27-17

I guess one could say the St Lucie River is getting a new year’s present in that yesterday was the last scheduled release from Lake Okeechobee by the Army Corp of Engineers. The entire situation has a similar theme to an abusive relationship where the beaten thanks their oppressor for finally halting…

Therefore, I will not say “thank you.”

http://www.saj.usace.army.mil/Media/News-Releases/Article/1402349/corps-transitions-to-lower-flows-from-lake-okeechobee/

http://www.saj.usace.army.mil/Media/News-Releases/Article/1402349/corps-transitions-to-lower-flows-from-lake-okeechobee/

Due to Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR) because of the President’s visit to Palm Beach, it was not possible to fly south along Jupiter Island from Witham Field in Stuart, however, when the wind and runway changed my husband, Ed, was able to get a few aerials at the Crossroads of the St Lucie River and Indian River Lagoon around Sewall’s Point. No seagrass, but the water already looks better.

After being decimated in 2013; part of 2015; toxic in 2016; and experiencing a no-holds-barred discharge rate since September 20, 2017, post Irma; we will continue to fight for the EAA Reservoir’s success and a better 2018 for our St Lucie River.

We shall never, never, never, give up!

Please see links to my brother Todd Thurlow’s website for St Lucie Canal Real Time Flows S-80 Cumulative 2017 and Latest Lake O Satellite Imagery

http://www.thurlowpa.com/LakeOLiveData/2017/

http://www.thurlowpa.com/LakeOImagery/LakeO3x7days.html

http://tfr.faa.gov/tfr_map_ims/html/index.html http://tfr.faa.gov/tfr_map_ims/html/ns/scale5/tile_14_15.html http://tfr.faa.gov/tfr_map_ims/html/ns/scale6/tile_28_29.html
All photos of SLR/IRL by Ed Lippisch 12-27-17

ACOE data is for previous weeks. Obviously the St Lucie gets enough redirected and area runoff without Lake O. ACOE 12-21-17

End of Year Water-Warrior, A Humpback Whale! SLR/IRL

Pinterest image, uncredited, 2017

As the year 2017 comes to a close, we had a special guest sighted in our offshore waters. On December 17th, a Humpback whale was seen breaching in the Atlantic off of Stuart!

Although these mammoth creatures do migrate, and thus navigate our seas, this is a special and rare site.

Perhaps this is time for reflection…

Just as with the Biblical story of Jonah and the Whale, the Native People also give whale sightings and experiences special significance.

According to native lore, “whales visitors/spirits were used to convey a message of power and might, representing the need for strong, silent deliberation.”

Native Images, whales

In the story of Jonah, having turned away from responsibility, and being thrown as “bad luck” from a ship, Jonah is swallowed by a giant whale, reflects, repents, is renewed, is given a second chance, is ejected, and fulfills his responsibilities….

Perhaps there is a lighter message from our visiting whale, like “Happy Holidays,” and “Merry Christmas,” or a fun breach-splash saying “Yahoo! Keep up the fight for clean water!”

For me, the whale visitation made me reminisce on Ed and my visit to Baja, in 2013, to visit the Grey Whales once slaughtered, and now a great tourist attraction, and how this experience of seeing these huge mammals adapt to our human world, especially the mothers with their calves,–the controversy, and alteration in both human and whale actions—– changed my life, and my outlook forever.

Grey Whales, San Ignacio, Baja, 2013 Mexico https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/08/gray-whales-baja-mexico/
Saying hi to Grey Whale
Baby Grey Whale encouraged to visit side of boat by its mother

In any case, the season is upon us and I am grateful for all of the work done this year for our waters and for our Florida. Thank you River Warriors! Thank you Bullsugar! Thank you Captains for Clean Water! Thank you people of Florida! Thank you President Negron! Thank you all, so many others across our great state! And in closing, thank you visiting whale!

Sometimes it is hard to stay motivated,  but like Winston Churchill said: “Never Give Up.” Our work is so important!

…Yes, in 2018, in spite of the difficulties, we will continue to be the strong, silent or screaming giant that dominates the conscience of Florida…

Humpback whale, Stuart, Dec 17, 2017

Watch TCPalm video here: http://www.tcpalm.com/videos/news/local/martin-county/2017/12/18/video-humpback-whale-sighted-off-shore-near-stuart/108725684/

Video credit:
Mattanza Charters, based in Pirates Cove Resort and Marina in Port Salerno, posted video taken Sunday, Dec. 17, 2017, of humpback whales breaching near Eight Mile Reef in the Atlantic. VIDEO PROVIDED BY CAPT. MIKE MURRAY Wochit

—————————–

http://us.whales.org/species-guide/humpback-whale

http://www.whalesforever.com/whales-in-art-literature-mythology.html

http://www.esotericmeanings.com/jonahs-whale/

Summary, CRC Committee Week 12-11-17, “Cease-Fire-2; Win-1”

Tallahassee is a beautiful place. Having spent more time there recently, I have grown to appreciate it. Sometimes, in the early morning, as the sun is rising over the hills,  I envision Apalachee warriors and families approaching “Anhaica,” their capital. There is a lot of sacred ground here…

Today, I will summarize week 12-11-17. For me, there were battles won, and cease-fires. And the war for Florida’s environment will continue. Thank you to all who wrote members of committees in support in the previous weeks!

Sunset Stuart
St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon. Photo Jenny Flaugh.

P23 http://flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner/2017/0023 (cease-fire)

On Tuesday, December 12th, I presented proposal P23, ” A Right to a Clean and Healthful Environment,” to the Judicial Committee (https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees/JU/). I am proud to say P23 has caused a stir, is making people think, and generating tremendous resistance from the “entrenched-status-quo-power” of the government and business communities as it would give every-day Floridians more standing in court for a clean environment. Power would shift to the judicial, rather than the executive and legislative branches of government, and some agencies would be no longer be “puppets.”

The presentation went well, however, based on comments from many members of the committee, and feedback, I felt the vote would not pass. I was offered a “TP” or “temporary postponement” in order to work on the language as I had not been successful at this —with the opposition —-who refused to do so the previous two weeks. They want “no part of P23 in the constitution.”

Unlike local government, where a commission or council  can adjust the language of an ordinance during the meeting, this cannot occur during a CRC committee meeting, so the only way to achieve such is to “postpone” and “work on” prior to the next meeting— and try again. (Very inefficient)…

So, I look forward to working on the language, but I am concerned that ameliorating the language to an acceptable point for the opposition will be so far away from the spirit of the original proposal it may not be recognizable or effective. This would not be good.

In the end, it will be the students of Stetson and Barry Universities and their professors who created P23, a totally public proposal, who will give me final direction.

P23 will go before the Judicial Committee again when called. Chances are this will be in January 2018. It could pass; it could die; it could be withdrawn. Should it pass, it will have to go also to the General Provisions committee, and then to the full CRC for a final vote to go to ballot.

The greatest aspect of P23 is working with young people who are our future generation of leaders because as the proposal states: “the natural resources of the state are the legacy of present and future generations…”

Florida Channel video of Judicial Committee meeting and P23 presentation, 1st in line: https://thefloridachannel.org/videos/12-12-17-constitution-revision-commission-judicial-committee/

Jim Turner reporting P23, Daily Business Review: https://www.law.com/dailybusinessreview/sites/dailybusinessreview/2017/12/13/environmental-proposal-delayed-amid-business-outcry/?slreturn=20171119081526

Amd ! 2014 Water and Land Legacy victorybycounty-75bluegreen

P46 https://www.flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner/2017/0046 (cease-fire)

On Wednesday, 12-13-17, I presented P46, to the Legislative Committee (https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees/LE/) to “Clarity Language in Article X, Section 28, of the Florida Constitution, Land Acquisition Trust Fund.” Ms. Sue Mullins, who came to my attention through Stuart’s Joan Bausch and the Native Plant Society, was very helpful and knowledgeable and assisted during the presentation. Again, the proposal was “TP-ed” as Chair Pepe Diaz and others such as former Senate President, Tom Lee said they could not support P46 as written and recommended working together on the language. I am confident they meant this, and we shall try between now and when the committee meets again in January. Their concerns are funding requirements, appropriations, of the state legislature; and our concern is the Legislature ignoring a 2014 citizen initiative that passed by 75% for land conservation. P46 too must  go to General Provisions should it pass, and then to the whole CRC for a vote to possibly go on ballot.

Florida Channel of Legislative Committee meeting, 2nd in line: https://thefloridachannel.org/videos/12-13-17-constitution-revision-commission-legislative-committee/

screenshot
OILED SCARLET IBIS – Lindsay Carr Created in response to the BP Gulf Oil Spill and auctioned off in support of the clean up operation. In the style of John James Audubon.

P91 http://flcrc.gov/Proposals/Commissioner/2017/0091 (win)

On Thursday, 12-14-17, I presented P91 “No Oil or Gas Drilling in Florida’s Territorial Waters.” This was an interesting experience as I was presenting to the committee I chair, General Provisions. (https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees/GP/)

As a presenter, I am just like anybody else.

Mr David R. Mica, Executive Director of the Florida Petroleum Council, AIF, and other business interests spoke against, but fortunately, Mr Manley Fuller, president of the Florida Wildlife Federation, the Sierra Club, and citizens spoke “for,” and were quite convincing. There were even two young children in the audience rooting me on! I was very pleased when the committee voted 5 to 2 in favor of P91! P91 will now go to the Declaration of Rights Committee (https://www.flcrc.gov/Committees/DR/) in January, and then if passes, again, to the full commission to possibly go on 2018 ballot.

Florida Channel General Provisions, 1st in line:
https://thefloridachannel.org/videos/12-14-17-constitution-revision-commission-general-provisions-committee/

WFSU’s Lynn Hatter:http://news.wfsu.org/post/move-ban-offshore-oil-and-gas-drilling-gets-underway

It was an exciting week. There are many more battles to be fought; and I so appreciate your support and assistance.

.Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 12.24.26 PM

Sunrise in Tallahassee, JTL

jacqui _MG_1455a_small_Robert_Holland_original

Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch, CRC 2018: https://www.flcrc.gov/Commissioners/Thurlow-Lippisch

IMG_2448