Sugarland Road Trip to the Caloosahatchee, Celebrating 50 Years of Friendship along the St Lucie/Indian River Lagoon

Martin County High School Class of 82 friends celebrated their 50th birthday on the Caloosahatchee, the sister river to the St Lucie.
Girlfriends from the Martin County High School Class of 1982 celebrating our 50th birthdays in Sanibel/Captiva, the area of the Caloosahatchee River, Lee County, Florida.

This past weekend, my girlfriends from high school decided to travel across the state to celebrate our 50th birthdays!

photo

It was a great time. We stayed in the area of the Caloosahatchee River which is the sister river the the St Lucie River. Both rivers have been plumbed to take overflow waters from Lake Okeechobee that Nature meant to flow south to the Everglades. The Caloosahatchee, in fact, is the “bigger sister,” in that when the rains come, she takes three to four times as much polluted, fresh water as we do—she is longer and larger than ourself. Ironically now, year long,  the river needs constant small releases of fresh water from the lake as she becomes too saline. The system is suffering as is the St Lucie.

Caloosahatchee River was the first estuary to be channelized and connected to Lake Okeechobee in the late 1800s by Hamilton Disston.
Caloosahatchee River was the first estuary to be channelized and connected to Lake Okeechobee in the late 1800s by Hamilton Disston. (Photo, CRCA)

“Caloosahtchee” means “river of the Calusa,” after the native peoples who lived and thrived there thousands of years ago.

So how does the Calooshatchee compare to the St Lucie? Well, according to the Caloosahatchee River Citizens Association, (CRCA), as sea levels receded after the last ice age, a series of lakes connected by wet prairies fed a tiny lake in the center of a valley feeding a “tortuously” long, crooked river that flowed slowly west to the Gulf of Mexico. So the Calooshatchee like the St Lucie drained to the sea but was never “connected” to Lake Okechobee. 

But then entered “modern man.”

In 1881, investor and business man, Hamilton Disston, bought four million acres of Florida lands for development and agriculture getting the state out of debt.  His first project was to drain the land around lake Okeechobee.

He dynamited the water fall between Lake Flirt and the Caloosahatchee and connected an old Indian passage from the Caloosahtchee to the lake. With that and the dredging and channeling of the mouth of the Kissimmee, the lake dropped tremendously, and although Disston committed suicide in a bathtub after the Panic of 1893, he inspired those following him to continue the drainage machine that has formed the Florida  we know today.

After the floods and hurricanes of 1926 and 1928  the Caloosahatchee was straightened, deepened, and widened, draining surrounding agricultural lands and controlling flood waters.  The “improvements” continued again in the the 1950s as more people moved into the area.

The story of the Calooshatchee is very similar to the St Lucie.

On another note, one of the most interesting parts of getting to the Caloosahatchee with my friends was driving “under” Lake Okeechobee taking Highways 441, to 80, to 27 and passing through the sugar towns of Belle Glade, South Bay, Clewiston and La Belle. It was a  three and a half hour drive from Stuart to Captiva and most of the drive was through the Everglades Agricultural Area.

The Everglades Agricultural Area is 700,000 acres south of Lake Okeechobee.
The Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) is 700,000 acres south of Lake Okeechobee. To drive through them one drives just south of the lake.

As we were driving through we were amazed to think that historically the waters of Lake Okeechobee went south,  as today, south of the lake,  it is sugar fields for as far as the eye can see! And for many, many miles you are driving right next to the dike.

“This is kind of weird…”

Mile upon mile of sugar fields is the view while  traveling south of the lake.
Mile upon mile of sugar fields is the view while traveling south of the lake.
Southern dike around Lake Okeechobee looks more like a hill of grass.
Southern dike around Lake Okeechobee looks more like a hill of grass.

I reminded my friends of the hurricane of 1928 and the thousands of migrant workers that were killed with no alert of the coming doom. The small dike around the southern lake certainly did not look like it would hold if another monster storm came. We talked about how clueless we were as kids to the environmental effects of agriculture on our St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon compared to what the children are learning today.

Of course we need agriculture but to have 700,000 acres completely cut off water flow south of the lake is an accident waiting to happen and a death sentence for our St Lucie Indian River Lagoon and for the Caloosahatchee.

As I talked about a possible third outlet to the lake, I told my friend Jill not to speed because if we were stopped, and I was in the car, we would all certainly go to jail!They laughed knowing I am an advocate for the St Lucie/Indian River Lagoon an often contentious issue when it comes to sugar farming.

Once in Captiva, we had a great time, paddle boarding, riding bicycles, swimming, and going out in Sanibel/Captiva Island.

Such a wonderful time would not have been possible had the Army Corp and South Florida Water Management District been releasing masses of polluted, fresh water from Lake Okeechobee. United  we are on both sides of the state, that there has to be another option for Lake Okeechobee’s water coming through our estuaries–we are sisters!

A beautiful sunset over the convergence of Pine Island Sound and the Caloosahatchee.
A beautiful sunset over the convergence of Pine Island Sound and the Caloosahatchee , our sister river.

 

 

6 thoughts on “Sugarland Road Trip to the Caloosahatchee, Celebrating 50 Years of Friendship along the St Lucie/Indian River Lagoon

  1. This is a beautiful story of kinship and devotion on all levels – thank you.

    I had the same impression of the area when we drove over for the Sugarland Rally. It’s so different from what we’re exposed to here on the coast and yet we are connected and at the effect of it; “living downstream” sort to speak.

    Like

  2. Facebook friends, I thank you!Barbara Barrosa, Jody Bond, Angie Simmons Swenson and 36 others like this.

    Cristina Maldonado Great one!
    12 hours ago · Unlike · 2

    Clint Carbonneau Awesome Pic!! you all look great and not even close to looking 50!!
    12 hours ago · Unlike · 2

    Keri West Happy Birthday Girls
    12 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Lori Talbert Keyes Is that Vicki in the black happy days girls!
    11 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Sandy Van Looks like yall had a fun week-end.
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Tracy Marinello I had one of those big 5 0 bdays this year.
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Sandy Van You can stop now, you are making your mom older. lol
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Tracy Marinello lol it was a hard one to swallow…
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Sandy Van I’m sure it was.
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Debbie Goldsmith Harvey Happy Birthday girls! Sounds fun’
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Tracy Marinello 1964 must have been a great year for women
    10 hours ago · Unlike · 2

    Tracy Chase Barnes That is Vicki!
    9 hours ago · Unlike · 2

    Lori Talbert Keyes Cool!
    9 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Raluca J Rosenberg Happy 50 to all of you, but, if I may say so, not one of you looks a day older than 25
    8 hours ago · Unlike · 2

    Alice L. Luckhardt June 29th coming soon!
    8 hours ago · Unlike · 2

    Lucy Susan Angelowalker A very cool weekend, what happens in Captiva stays in Captiva !!!
    6 hours ago · Unlike · 3

    Shelly Scott Caldwell Sorry I missed it!
    5 hours ago · Unlike · 1

    Patty Heitzman I’ll turn 50 on November 1.
    about an hour ago · Unlike · 1

    Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch It was a wonderful time. I like being 50! Almost Alice L. Luckhardt!(:
    a few seconds ago · Like
    Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch

    Like

  3. Pine Island Sound is a beautiful boat cruising ground, one of my favorites.

    W.E. “Ted” Guy, Jr.

    643 SW Fuge Rd

    Stuart, Fl 34997

    (772) 287-4106 (home)

    (772) 485-1866 (cell/car)

    guywe2@gmail.com

    Like

  4. Nice post. I was checking continuously this blog and I am impressed!
    Very useful info specifically the last part 🙂 I care for
    such info much. I was looking for this certain info for a long time.

    Thank you and good luck.

    Like

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