“State of Emergency” Halts Northern Waters, but Not Lake’s Algae Waters, SLR/IRL

2. Lake O alae 6 26 2016
1. Lake O algae 6 26 2016
Map of bloom
Map of bloom
2. Lake O alae 6 26 2016
2. Lake O algae 6 26 2016
SFWMD canal and basin map. C-44 canal is the canal most southerly in the image.
SFWMD canal and basin map. C-44 canal is the canal most southerly in the image. S-308 is at the lake, Port Mayaca and S-80 along the C-44 canal. Both discharge into SLR.

Today’s photos were taken by Dr Gary Goforth this past Sunday.  During a trip, he flew over Lake Okeechobee.

He writes: “Jacqui–The photos are of the southeast part of Lake; the plane had just passed over Clewiston and is headed northeast. The city of Pahokee is visible along the upper right shoreline. The FPL reservoir is visible in the background. The bloom is enormous – easily over 100 sq miles in extent, although areas are patchy.” GG

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STATE OF EMERGENCY

It’s hard to understand state of emergencies.

Martin County waters are experiencing  their third “state of emergency” since 2013–two of those being this year in 2016.

Yesterday, Governor Rick Scott declared one, after our county commission declared one first, over the blue-green algae blooms in the St Lucie River, Indian River Lagoon and Atlantic Ocean —I am very grateful.

What I do not understand is that when you really read between the lines, we will continue to be under siege.

After one sifts through the words of the declaration there are basic things that stand:  the emergency order directs Water Management Districts and the Florida Wildlife Commission to stop flows into the lake as soon as possible coming from the north. It also allows a waiver of requirements to purchase pumps to move water south, and increases water testing.

This is all good and well, but there is one problem. This means the discharges from the lake continue– perhaps lessened, but they will continue…full of the same algae that is causing the emergency in the first place. And the lake is very high at 14.90. The dumping could go on for months even if no new water enters the lake from the north…

Until the gates at S-308 and S-80 are closed we will suffer. Like having the dike too high is a safety issue for those south of the lake, sending the lake’s algae waters to the St Lucie River is a safety issue too. Take a look.

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ACOE Lake O: http://w3.saj.usace.army.mil/h2o/currentLL.shtml

Rick Scott’s site: (http://www.flgov.com/2016/06/29/gov-scott-declares-state-of-emergency-in-st-lucie-and-martin-counties-following-algal-blooms/)

Simplified Emergency Order and short article Stuart Magazine: (http://www.stuartmagazine.com/up-front/noteworthy/gov-rick-scott-declares-state-emergency-over-blue-green-algae-blooms)

 

From: "Wesley Scott"
From: “Wesley Scott” <wes@indianrivershutter.com>
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2 thoughts on ““State of Emergency” Halts Northern Waters, but Not Lake’s Algae Waters, SLR/IRL

  1. Right, Jacqui but the gate at Port Mayaca (S-308) is the main culprit. We could handle, and have addressed, the S-80 discharges at Stuart that come from “local” watersheds.

    The big dumps are strictly done in order to keep Big Sugar reclaimed land dry and toasty. The EAA overdrainage sucks six feet out of the EAA, transforming vital wetlands into high-profit sugar cane centers.

    Liked by 1 person

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