7 thoughts on “50,000 pounds! Incredible Early Commercial Fishing Memoirs of the St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon

  1. Just checking your blog on your dad’s computer. It is wonderful you have a way to share this long buried stuff. Curd was the nephew of Otto and Ernest Stypmann. So he joined his uncles. Mom

    From: Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch Sent: Friday, August 25, 2017 10:59 AM To: tom@thurlowbooks.com Subject: [New post] 50,000 pounds! Incredible Early Commercial Fishing Memoirs of the St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon

    Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch posted: ” Today I share an incredible historic piece about commercial fishing, written by a leading citizen of Stuart’s earliest days, Mr Curt Schroeder. My mother, historian, Sandra Henderson Thurlow, transcribed his writings. They are typed fro” Respond to this post by replying above this line

    New post on Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch

    50,000 pounds! Incredible Early Commercial Fishing Memoirs of the St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon by Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch

    Photo, Robert M. Pitchford, as seen on page 45 of “Stuart on the St Lucie” by Sandra Henderson Thurlow.

    Today I share an incredible historic piece about commercial fishing, written by a leading citizen of Stuart’s earliest days, Mr Curt Schroeder. My mother, historian, Sandra Henderson Thurlow, transcribed his writings. They are typed from a handwritten, unpublished, manuscript. The first time she shared the piece with me I was spellbound and even speechless during parts.

    As an animal lover, the story of capturing the manatee, eating loggerhead turtles, or having to tie a line around a cabbage palm tree to hold off a net full of fighting mullet was unsettling to me. Nevertheless, those were the times, people were struggling to make ends meet, and the river fed them. They were trying to get everything they could get! In time, it was realized that they were “killing the goose that laid the golden egg…”

    Mr Schroeder’s excerpt about the effects of the St Lucie Canal’s (C-44) connecti

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  2. amazing stuff!!! if only we could go back in time….

    On Fri, Aug 25, 2017 at 10:59 AM, Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch wrote:

    > Jacqui Thurlow-Lippisch posted: ” Today I share an incredible historic > piece about commercial fishing, written by a leading citizen of Stuart’s > earliest days, Mr Curt Schroeder. My mother, historian, Sandra Henderson > Thurlow, transcribed his writings. They are typed fro” >

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I have places now that large pompano jump around my boat ,turn sideways and skip across the water. schools of 5-6 foot tarpon have gathered awaiting the mullet run. Billions of menhaden are feeding Record amounts of blue crab being harvested and it all has to do with the algae that grows on the calcium sand I put in. In this blog it says too much fresh water was killing the clams and oysters. What they did not realize was the chemistry changed when the removed the oysters on the shore. In the summer tides were much higher (like they are now) oysters would grow high on the shore. During the dry season water levels would drop and many oysters would die leaveing their calcium shells. When the water level would come back up again all the pee and poop would churn in these shells. The acid reacting with the calcium would release oxygen that would speed up the chemistry between the pee and poop to make calcium cloride salt. TAKEING THE OYSTER SHELLS FROM THE SHORE broke the cycle and their was no longer any salt being made during rainy season. For every 100,000 pounds of fish they removed Probably half of that was calcium bones. When fish die many float to shore and leave their bones on the shore. Good blog and thank you for letting me tell it like it is

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