ACOE’s “Changing of the Guard,” SLR, IRL

Me at a SFWMD WRAC meeting standing with ACOE Lt.Col. Greco. Greco oversees the Jacksonville District under Col Alan Dodd, 2015.
SFWMD WRAC meeting with ACOE Lt. Col. Thomas Greco. Greco is a graduate of West Point and oversees the Jacksonville District under Col. Alan Dodd (Photo Marsha Musgrove, 2015.)
River Kidz member Brandon Collins and ACOE Col. Alan Dodd at a Rivers Coalition meeting in 2013. (Photo JTL)
River Kidz member Brandon Collins and ACOE Col. Alan Dodd. Dodd is a graduate of the US Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. (Rivers Coalition meeting in 2013,  JTL)

“Keep Your Friends Close and Your Enemies Closer,” Machiavelli, “The Prince”

Since the Army Corp of Engineers is military, I don’t think they will be insulted with my quoting Machiavelli. After all, the “combat” strategy of protecting the St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon, requires us to know what our enemies are doing, so we don’t get ambushed.

The Jacksonville ACOE is responsible for overseeing the safety of the Herbert Hoover Dike around Lake Okeechobee which means that although many, including the South Florida Water Management District, have input, the ACOE is the entity that releases sometimes toxic polluted lake water into the St Lucie River/Indian River Lagoon and Calooshahatchee.

This is a disgusting and frustrating reality.

So how do we change this? I believe a good start is by building relationships while educating and sharing with the people of the Army Corp the awful plight of our rivers, our children, and our community.

And now, with all of your help and outcry,  they “get it,” believe me.

Unfortunately, this strategy doesn’t gain much traction as the ACOE changes out their leaders EVERY 3 YEARS!  But over time, it will.

You have probably heard that the present Jacksonville Colonel,  Alan Dodd, and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Greco are leaving by June of 2015?

Col. Dodd (bio:http://www.saj.usace.army.mil/About/Leadership/BioArticleView/tabid/6105/Article/480017/colonel-alan-m-dodd.aspx)

Lt Col. Greco: (http://www.saj.usace.army.mil/About/Leadership/BioArticleView/tabid/6105/Article/480018/lieutenant-colonel-thomas-m-greco.aspx)

This is my second changing of the guard. Three years ago, I said goodbye to Col. Pantano and Lt .Col. Kinard. Both very good men. Again, frustrating!

I recently asked ACOE Public Outreach Specialist, Mr John Campbell why this is the policy and expressed my frustration. His response is important to share:

“As you know, the Corps is an organization within the larger U.S. Army.
Similar to large corporations, the Army has embraced a philosophy of
developing leaders by rotating them through different assignments.

The only decent reference I could find is DA PAM 600-3, which is 400 pages
outlining the Army’s strategy on developing officers. In a nutshell, officer
development focuses on the balance of breadth and depth of experience. Two
to three years in a particular assignment is typical for the Army because it
allows for that breadth of experience. Depth is gained through higher
education, formal training, and experience gained in positions.

As officers move from job to job, the Army’s intent is to provide an overall
career path that not only prepares them for higher level responsibilities,
but one that prepares officers–in any assignment and given their level of
responsibility–to expertly perform their job.

From my personal experience, I know that leading people and organizations
shares similar characteristics regardless of the situation. A leader must
initially assess a situation, oftentimes with imperfect information, before
researching, developing, and testing potential courses of action. Based on
this analysis, the leader decides which course of action to pursue and how
to monitor and evaluate results.

By rotating through different assignments, military officers get an
opportunity to put the skills above in practice whether it’s leading an
infantry brigade or formulating policy on ecosystem restoration.” —John Campbell, ACOE

 

In the past, Col. Pantano went to Afghanistan. I am not  sure where Col Dodd and Lt Col. Greco are going, but I wish them well, safety, thank them for their service, and charge them to also help educate the world of our plight.

So, in spite of the web of difficulties to navigate as we say “farewell,”  let us prepare! Who will the new Col. and Lt. Col. be? Mr Campbell has shared the following:

The new colonel will be Col. Jason Kirk, commandeer at the Charleston, South Carolina District.  The Lt. Col.,  who we will be closer to as this position resides in West Palm Beach, is scheduled to be Lt Col. Jennifer Reynolds of the Washington DC office. (No photo or bio yet.) Wow. A woman. Things can change! 🙂

Col. Kirk’s Linked in bio can be found here: (https://www.linkedin.com/pub/jason-kirk/17/377/927)

Col Jason Kirk will take over the position as Col of the Jacksonville ACOE in the next few months. (File photo, 2014)
Col. Jason Kirk will take over the position top position at the Jacksonville ACOE in the next few months. (File photo, 2014)

So here we go again. Changing the world one person at a time.

“Grab you weapons! Assume your positions! And charge!”

________________________

ACOE Jacksonville District: (http://www.saj.usace.army.mil) 

 

 

4 thoughts on “ACOE’s “Changing of the Guard,” SLR, IRL

  1. I read where col.Kirk is from Missouri and he mentioned the town of Rolla. Rolla is only 20 miles from Ft Lenordwood. I may have help build some of the buildings he designed. One thing they left out in the video of how to make the dike hurricane proof. It is how acid in water turns calcium to jello. By its self calcium packs hard but there are tiny–and sometimes big shells in it. Durring a hurricane wind blowing constantly will build up all the organic material and acids on the shore. Then during the hurricane swells and waves will force acid water into these spaces between these shells and then pull desolved calcium soil out creating these blowouts they talked about. To me putting calcium sand and shells in the water seems the obvious way to neutralize this threat to the integraty of the dike

    Like

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