Beautiful but…seagrass is the life

These pictures were taken by my husband, Ed Lippisch, on 10-27-21. It was such a busy few days, that I really did not get to look at them until now. The first thing that struck me was the beauty and the interesting geometric shapes. We certainly live in a gorgeous place. This year the river has suffered from tremendous run-off from the C-23, C-24 and C-44 canals  as well as stormwater runoff from all of our yards, driveways, and streets. Fortunately, we did not have major, long lasting, discharges from Lake Okeechobee. Fortunately, we were not struck by a hurricane!

-10-14-21 SFWMD Ecological Update, Laurence Glen

I wanted to share this entire series of aerials as I think they complete a picture and give one the feeling of flight. The St Lucie Sailfish Flats look beautiful but please keep in mind that although you will see some dark areas on the sandbars that look like recovering seagrass, reports from Indian Riverkeeper, Mike Connor, and others, report various clinging algae more than lush seagrass beds. My brother, Todd Thurlow, has been reporting on the  phenomenon of seagrass loss at recent Rivers Coalition meetings by comparing Google Earth images. You can go to his website eyeonlakeo.com to view in detail.

The St Lucie/Southern IRL has not had a “major event” since 2018 and worse, 2016, when the entire rive became a toxic soup due primarily to the discharges from Lake Okeechobee over an already impaired system. The ACOE and SFWMD continue to move forward on exciting projects that will help improve the river’s woes. The first of these to come on line will be the C-44 Reservoir in Indiantown. This ribbon-cutting will happen this month. I will be reporting on it and other components of CERP’s Indian River Lagoon South that are in motion. With Indian River Lagoon South and the EAA Reservoir there is hope. Actually there is more than hope. Our river one day, shall recover. Please do your part to refrain from fertilizers, and if you have one, keep a clean septic tank until you can go to sewer. Agriculture, too, must do its part, as we continue our journey to build a healthy water future.

SFWMD canal and basin map

 

17 thoughts on “Beautiful but…seagrass is the life

  1. In Texas, where I lived for 35 years in corporate jobs, seagrass protection was a priority. Near my beach house down there near Corpus Christi, in the magnificent Laguna Madre, seagrass was abundant and if you ran through it and cut a prop path, you were severely fined by the State.
         The Corpus Christi area has refineries, natural gas shipping terminals, is a busy port, all on the Bay,  And yet in the Bay and the adjoining Laguna Madre, water quality is clear, seagrass flourishing, redfish and trout abundant, and wildlife thriving.
          Clearly good management, careful forward thinking, an aggressive State control makes a difference. Jacqui, you and your State Board actions are what we need for South Florida!

    Henry Stanley
    Marco Island

      1. You’re welcome Jacqui. I lived in Texas, but I grew up in Stuart and went to Martin County high School with your dad. It is so wonderful to read your comments about your youth and the condition of the river back then. Please keep up the good work!

      2. I see this response has me listed as anonymous.. so I’m resending.
        You’re welcome Jacqui. I lived in Texas, but I grew up in Stuart and went to Martin County high School with your dad. It is so wonderful to read your comments about your youth and the condition of the river back then. Please keep up the good work!
        — Henry Stanley

          1. Jacqui, your mom just sent me a picture of the 1952 MCHS football team. I’m (#33) standing right behind your father (#42)… Pretty cool. It appears the photo is still hanging in some sports bar in Stuart. 😎
            — Henry

  2. Great picture by your husband and as usual great commentary by you Jacqui! Your blog is very reassuring to those of us on the West Coast that someday we too can have some positive progress toward stopping the release of cyanobacteria laden water from Lake O.

  3. Sorry about my previous “Anonymous” login! Great picture by your husband and as usual great commentary by you Jacqui! Your blog is very reassuring to those of us on the West Coast that someday we too can have some positive progress toward stopping the release of cyanobacteria laden water from Lake O.

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